Standing in line in front of the Troubadour, one couldn’t help but feel they were one of the lucky few to have passes to see arguably the world’s most famous guitarist, Slash, return to one of the venues where his legend was built.  This was especially true since tickets sold out seconds after they went on sale then steadily climbed to five times that amount on the secondary market.

As many fans passed through the entrance and breathed a sigh of relief that their passes were in fact authentic, they remembered to set up shop near the right side of the stage.  This was, in fact, the area that the legend would be roaming for most of the night.  That’s not to say the rest of the band (officially dubbed “Slash featuring Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators”) was not oozing with talent – it’s in fact the best avenue through which to hear selections from the classic Guns N’ Roses catalog, given that Axl Rose’s voice is (sadly) currently a shell of its former glorious self.

Just as the opening opening act, Hillbilly Herald, closed their odd set, without so much as once standing up, an eagle eyed fan could in fact peer up and see a familiar top hat and frizzy hair peer through the curtains of the dressing room.

The lights went out and after the circus music stopped, Slash unassumingly entered the stage with his band ripping though You’re a Lie and such classics as Rocket Queen and Sweet Child O’ Mine, before closing with the staple Paradise City.  A small mosh pit during Slither even “helped” some of the fans get closer to the stage where they found themselves within an arm’s length of the man himself.

When the lights stopped strobing and the bows were taken, there was a sense of satisfaction that permeated the crowd that felt like even though this was not the classic Guns N’ Roses, they all had all been transported back to the Strip in 1987 for a few hours and come back with memories of a legend being at the top of his game.